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Posts Tagged ‘Kennebunkport scenic cruises’

Maine Maycations and Scenic Cruises

April 7th, 2012 by Gail

Kennebunks Bed and Breakfast in the winter.

Bailey enjoying a romp in the snow.

Maine is lovely any time of year; we love the snow as much as we love the warm, summer evenings, and Bailey quite possibly prefers the snow. Yet there are some people, we know, who would never dream of traveling to a Maine Bed and Breakfast in the winter.

It is undeniable that some of Maine hibernates during the winter. But these days, signs of spring are everywhere. Restaurants are opening their shutters, shops are opening their doors, and boats are coming out of dry dock and making their way up the coast. Everyone is enjoying the fragrant combination of salt water and spring flowers that permeates the air.

Many guests of our Kennebunk/Kennebunkport Bed and Breakfast like to spend a few hours on a boat while they’re here. Scenic cruises are, after all, part of a quintessential Maine vacation. Happily, most boats open their decks to passengers in May.

Rugosa Lobster Tours, Kennebunkport

Picture yourself aboard the Rugosa this spring.

The Schooner Eleanor is a wonderful 55 ft sailing ship with four sails, a large teak cockpit, and a spacious, cushioned cabin. She sails up the coast daily from mid May to mid October.

Watch a classic New England wooden lobster work the Kennebunk River, or roll up your sleeves and lend a hand. Rugosa Lobster Tours opens for the season towards the end of May; the date varies depending on the weather.

Whale watching is another fun way to get out on the water. First Chance Whale Watch heads out to big waters in search of the great beasts. Finbacks, Humpbacks, Minkes, and even Blue Whales are frequently spotted during the 4.5 hour adventures. The first Whale Watch cruises depart over Memorial Day weekend.

We’re already looking ahead to the salad days of spring and summer at our Kennebunk/Kennebunkport Bed and Breakfast. We hope you are, too.

Kennebunkport Whale Watching Cruises.

A Minke whale surfacing.

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